A spot of bother

I, Ian, am writing this blog post on behalf of Sheryl as she is having difficulty typing.  It has been a rough few weeks.

The lymphedema in Sheryl’s right arm and shoulder has continued to get worse.  We have been to the Saanich Peninsula ER twice for the pain that her swollen arm has caused.  The lymphatic fluid has broken through the skin on her arm.

She has been pulled off the Capecitabine by her oncologist.  We had to go to emergency at Royal Jubilee Hospital at 1:30 am on May  8th.  She was prescribed hydromorphone pills and hydromorphone injections to break through when the pain of her arm became too bad.  Sheryl’s oncologist advised that the she needed to come off the Capecitabine as it was no longer working. Her right lung has also been filling with lymphatic fluid. Sheryl, always the fighter, asked if there were any other possible treatment options that could be attempted.  There was one but the Oncologist did not recommend it.  The treatment would require Sheryl to attend a private injection clinic for one drug and the Cancer Agency for another. She did want to attempt this but needed to stay out of hospital in order to qualify.

At home Sheryl had lost a lot of mobility.  Her left arm needed to be dressed and cleaned at least twice a day.  A home care nurse was visiting every two days and Sheryl’s mother, Joyce, was a great help during this time helping to change the wound dressing and care for Sheryl.

On May 16th we had an appointment at the pain and symptom clinic at the cancer agency.  It was a busy day for Sheryl as we had to give her a pain injection then clean the wound on her arm, get dressed and in the vehicle down to the Cancer Agency.  Sheryl has been too weak to walk any distance for the last few days prior so we got a wheelchair to go into the Cancer Agency.  Once in the room Sheryl felt nauseous and then had great difficulty breathing and was hyperventilating.  I hit the emergency button and the fantastic staff at the Cancer Agency jumped into action to get Sheryl Oxygen and medications to stabilize her. She was then transferred to the ER at Royal Jubilee in a short 1 block ambulance ride.

On Tuesday Sheryl was transferred to palliative care a the hospice.  They are managing her pain and have adjusted the dosages to help Sheryl be able to be alert and present. She would love to see all her friends and family that have always been so important to her throughout her life.

Please wish her the best while Sheryl goes through this difficult time.

2 thoughts on “A spot of bother

  1. Ian and Sheryl, much much love from Winnipeg. Thinking of and praying for both of you right now. You are both so brave!! Love love love.

    Like

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